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cutting things with seeds - new knife needed or...

Thu Apr 11, 2013 10:08 pm

Hi Guys,

I have two Gytuo's I use daily. One is a Goko 210 ( White #1 steel ) and the other, a Richmond 210 Laser ( Super Aogami steel ). Both are sharpened at about 13 degrees each side on an EP.

The problem.

I eat a lot of hot peppers and often like to chop them up finely. I've noticed that I am getting micro chips on the blades on both knives and am thinking the most likely cause are the seeds in the peppers. ( I cut on a wooden board )

If Gyutos simply cant chop seeds, ok, I can get a knife that can. However, as much as I love knives, I am not really looking for too many more so am wondering if running flatter bevels might be the solution. Given that the Goko is the heaver of the two knives, I am thinking its the candidate for this.

What do your guys think?

Re: cutting things with seeds - new knife needed or...

Thu Apr 11, 2013 10:51 pm

Maybe try a micro bevel on the Goko first and see if that helps?

Re: cutting things with seeds - new knife needed or...

Fri Apr 12, 2013 2:34 am

Yep...you can get micro sized chips more easily if the knife has an edge that has a 4-5 degree bevel(nearly flat when sharpening). One of my knives has 70/30 microbevel that appears to make it stronger, although i haven't done that much conclusive testing as of yet...but i know others have.

Re: cutting things with seeds - new knife needed or...

Fri Apr 12, 2013 2:37 am

Flatter bevels (lower angle) will make the problem worse since there is less steel behind the edge. The Micro Bevel will make the edge angle a little higher and leave a little more metal behind the edge without making it too thick edge wise.

Re: cutting things with seeds - new knife needed or...

Fri Apr 12, 2013 2:46 am

Yep..

I've been trying to find a way to edit posts(not sure if one can or not)...

Anyhow...i re-looked at my angles and the microbevel i used appears to be around 5 degrees(left side) and 25 degrees(right side)...and i'm right handed.

Re: cutting things with seeds - new knife needed or...

Fri Apr 12, 2013 3:20 am

desol wrote:I've been trying to find a way to edit posts(not sure if one can or not)...

Go to user control panel --> board preferences --> my language and select British English. An edit button will appear in the top right corner of your post along with other selections. You only have a certain amount of time to edit though.

Re: cutting things with seeds - new knife needed or...

Fri Apr 12, 2013 3:34 am

Great! Thanks Jeff...

Re: cutting things with seeds - new knife needed or...

Sat Apr 13, 2013 7:12 am

Are you deburring? Sounds like you might have a wire edge that is microchipping.

Re: cutting things with seeds - new knife needed or...

Sat Apr 13, 2013 6:48 pm

There are a lot of things which go to making one blade more chip resistant than another; but as a general rule White #1 is more chip prone than AS. More, san-mai AS is usually about as chip resistant as strong, well hardened alloys get, but... reality trumps theory. Whether any of that makes or will make a difference between your two knives is anyone's guess.

A "wire edge" usually bends more easily than it chips; so that probably isn't the biggest part of your problem. Still, it's a good idea to make sure your edges are thoroughly deburred.

If you're suffering chipping from ordinary use -- and chili seeds fall into the category of ordinary -- try getting a little more metal behind the edge. The extra mass will help dampen the impact and make the edge somewhat less likely to chip. Go with a "micro-bevel" for your the new cutting bevel. That is, sharpening the narrowest possible bevel angle over your current angle. If you're currently sharpening 13*, as you say; try sharpening a second bevel of around 18* over it, using as few strokes as possible.

If you're interested in trying it, but not sure how to go about sharpening a microbevel, just ask.

As a rule, 50/50 symmetry makes for the most durable edges; but you sacrifice a little perceived sharpness. The 60/40 - 2:1 - 70/30 neighborhood is a pretty good compromise for most people and most "V" edged knives. But when it comes to determining the best geometry for your own edges there's no substitute for screwing around.

Unless you already have one, there's no good reason to sharpen a different angle on each side. It's not a bad thing in a factory edge; but for someone who does his own sharpening, it doesn't add much in the way of sharpness, but is significantly more difficult to maintain.

BDL
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