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Coarse Stone Recommendation

Thu Nov 08, 2012 7:15 am

Looking for a new coarse stone and think I have narrowed it down to 3.
Bester 220
Nubatama 180
Shapton glass 220

Which stone would be the best at metal removal and have the longest life expectancy?
have not used GS yet and intrigued by ceramic
I would prefer a longer lasting stone than a faster/muddy one. hate stones that dish quickly.
I like Nubatama and it's a huge brick, but I don't want to overlook a similar stone for possibly less.
Please let me know your opinion. Also if there is something better. pref. under $60

Thanks for any advice!

Re: Coarse Stone Recommendation

Thu Nov 08, 2012 2:43 pm

What are you planning to do with said stone?

Every day thinning of normal knives can be done effectively with the 500 Beston. Including minor repairs. The Beston 500 is a quite fast cutting stone that doesn't dish really fast.

I've never used any of the three you're asking about, but I have used other 220 grit stones. My $0.02....you can do an awful lot of damage to a knife with such a coarse stone....please don't use unwisely. :)

Re: Coarse Stone Recommendation

Thu Nov 08, 2012 5:04 pm

The stone will be used for establishing bevels and repairs on tough wear resistant knives. I will not be using it for thinning.
The 600-800gr diamond plate isn't fast enough anymore(I cleaned "unclogged" it and still slow) and really don't like sharpening on it.
The cheap aluminum oxide stones are slow and dish before significant work is done and thats with a 150gr stone. The scratches were bearable but I didn't like working with that either.

I'm ballparking what grit to pick from the grit chart. I would desire the speed of a coarse diamond stone without the gouging scratches of larger diamonds.
Looking for some middle ground while still enjoying sharpening. I assume all coarse stones wear quickly; hopefully there's some out there that are slower than the rest.

Let me know what ya think

Re: Coarse Stone Recommendation

Thu Nov 08, 2012 5:29 pm

I'll throw in my 2 cents, I've been using the Nubatama Bamboo 150 for months now and have been extremely impressed. For such a low grit stone it dishes slowly. I use it for the same reasons you listed above, establishing bevels and minor repair work. Brings up a burr lightening fast on all my stainless steel and high carbon steel blades. - Josh

Re: Coarse Stone Recommendation

Thu Nov 08, 2012 8:27 pm

"I'll throw in my 2 cents, I've been using the Nubatama Bamboo 150 for months now and have been extremely impressed. For such a low grit stone it dishes slowly. I use it for the same reasons you listed above, establishing bevels and minor repair work. Brings up a burr lightening fast on all my stainless steel and high carbon steel blades. - Josh"

+1 I can't imagine not having this stone on my bench all the time. An incredible combination of fast plus a nice finish at the same time.

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Ken

Re: Coarse Stone Recommendation

Fri Nov 09, 2012 8:48 am

Thanks for the info. I've watched your videos (which are very detailed and informative) to help find a suitable grit.
What are the differences between the bamboo and ume series?
I have ume stones and like them lots; is performance gain worth the price?

Re: Coarse Stone Recommendation

Sat Nov 10, 2012 5:48 pm

Tough wear resistant steels? I wouldn't be using a waterstone. Guess it all depends on how you define that.

Re: Coarse Stone Recommendation

Sun Nov 11, 2012 9:28 am

Jason, you bring up a good point. For very wear resistant steels, I do think it is appropriate to use diamonds - plates, films, or compounds. But after using the coarser diamond plates - for example an Atoma 140, following it up with a stone like the Nubatama 150 works very nicely on most steels. In some instances for extremely abrasion resistant steels like CPM Rex 121, I find that I go with diamonds to a much finer grit before switching over to waterstones. For example 140 400 600 and 1200 Atomas. For the Rex 121 steel, I switch to diamond films past that. You can use waterstones, but they are way slower, even stones like the GlassStones and Sigma Power stones. But for less abrasion resistant but still quite abrasion resistant steels [read that twice], the initial bevel setting with diamonds followed by waterstones works out nicely.

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Ken

Re: Coarse Stone Recommendation

Sun Nov 11, 2012 12:18 pm

My purchase is for value and enjoyment factor. Price and dish resistence are values I'm looking for this coarse stone. I figure cutting speed mainly comes from grit rating. Fast is good and ideally I would like to move straight to a 1000gr. (got a 600gr stone bridging the two, would like to skip it entirely)

Jason B wrote-"Tough wear resistant steels? I wouldn't be using a waterstone. Guess it all depends on how you define that."

I"ll sharpen vanadium blends and such. I don't really see PM but IME carbon is easier and quicker sharpening than modern alloys (what I was referring as wear resistent). I don't want to buy more diamonds if I don't need to.

Currently leaning towards the Beston 220. Hard to match that price!

So would it be wise to progress from 220 to 1000? seems like a huge gap.

Thanks for the replies
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