Switch to full style
Post a reply

Ceramic steels

Fri Apr 18, 2014 4:15 pm

Currently have older Mundial (German steel) straight edge steak knives. Edges quickly flatten at the curve where the blade contacts the ceramic plates.

Regular steel takes forever to realign the edge. A small ceramic rod that came with my Edge Pro Apex does a better job but still a little slow.

QUESTION: I am considering a full size 12" ceramic rod. NOT looking for a super fine edge on steak knives, just quick clean up. Is the Idahone 12" too fine at 1200? Should I be looking at a more aggressive rod like the Messermeister 12" ? Would the latter also leave a "toothier" edge which can be beneficial for cutting steak?

Thanks, Tom

Re: Ceramic steels

Sun Apr 20, 2014 8:00 am

One thing about ceramic vs. Steel is that the ceramic will remove small amounts of metal while realigning micro serrations whereas the steel will simply realign. When dealing with softer steel some people prefer the metal rods because germans respond quickly to them. I dont think the idahone will provide too refined an edge at 1200 and if you want to go that route you wont be dissapointed. To more accurately answer, it would be helpful to know how frequently you sharpen and how high of a grit do you stop at? If you choose against the ceramic, stick with the German brands, particularly f. Dick

Re: Ceramic steels

Sun Apr 20, 2014 2:06 pm

Yes ceramics do remove a little metal. You can see it as your rod turns from white to grey.

Grooved metal rods will take of steel too. Even the fine rods remove metal. The smooth F Dick rods we sell will not remove anything.

The idahone 12" rod is cheap and works really well. I recommend it all the time. http://www.chefknivestogo.com/sharpeningrod.html

Re: Ceramic steels

Sun Apr 20, 2014 8:17 pm

I sharpen v edged steak knives then flatten the edge about 1/64" or less on an 800 or 1k stone. A couple of light strokes.

Re: Ceramic steels

Mon Apr 21, 2014 3:51 pm

I know Ben Dale suggests flattening the edge a little but I like them nice and sharp with no flat spots and I run them across the steel after every use. I would like a steel that is aggressive enough to hone the flat spot off with a couple strokes on each side.

Bought a box of the Mundial 5100 straight edge steak knives on closeout years ago when Mundial switched to the serrated style. Paid less than today's Chinese cheap junk so loss of metal is not a concern. Speed to get the edge back after a meal is.

Was also considering a diamond steel.

Thanks, Tom

Re: Ceramic steels

Mon Apr 21, 2014 4:08 pm

The Idahone would be the perfect tool for what your doing. It will align and clean up the edge at the same time. I would avoid a diamond steel, much to aggressive for your needs.

Re: Ceramic steels

Mon Apr 21, 2014 8:29 pm

Id avoid diamond, some people love them, but even a fine diamond rod is incredibly aggressive

Re: Ceramic steels

Tue Apr 22, 2014 12:34 am

I have Wusthof Classics & Japanese knives & would not use a diamond steel on them. For those I use the Edge Pro & then touch up with regular steel on Wusthof & small ceramic on Japanese.

For the Mundial steak knives I "want" aggressive.......couple passes each side & back into the block.

Re: Ceramic steels

Tue Apr 22, 2014 2:28 am

If aggresive is what you want, the diamond hone may do the trick, as far as I know, the richmond might be the most cost effective one

Re: Ceramic steels

Tue Apr 22, 2014 4:46 am

If you want to reset a rolled edge, any steel will do. I've used an old Mundial and had it respond well to the grooved steels for a rolled edge. The ceramic rods are best for the very light, mild sharpening. They're a stop gap measure, which doesn't seem to be your goal here. If you want your knives to be sharper, get out your EP and sharpen them 1-1.5k every few meals, followed by steeling after every use. The alternative sucks. Using a rod sequentially in the long run gives an inconsistent edge that gets harder and harder to work with. If you want them to last longer between sharpening, an Idahone would be a good pick, but it's not a magic wand.
Post a reply