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CCK Butcher's Knife

Tue May 07, 2013 11:06 pm

I'm looking for an inexpensive carbon steel knife for slicing meat. I may use for wild game processing as well as carving the Christmas turkey and roasts here and there. Would the CCK Butcher's knife be a good choice for this? http://www.chefknivestogo.com/cckbukn.html

I also intend to pick up one of the CCK Big Rhino Cleavers for bone chopping.

Thanks,
DeNomad

Re: CCK Butcher's Knife

Wed May 08, 2013 12:50 am

The CCK butcher's knife is good for (you're never going to guess) butchering, and less than ideal for carving. But anything sharp...

BDL

Re: CCK Butcher's Knife

Wed May 08, 2013 11:43 am

BDL thanks for the reply. Can you recommend a good carving knife? Maybe I'll just see how carving goes with my new 240 mm gyuto or maybe the butcher's knife first though.

Re: CCK Butcher's Knife

Wed May 08, 2013 1:02 pm

For carving, I would look for a sujihiki if you're after a Japanese knife.

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/nsearch.h ... 356&y=-139

A good, inexpensive version would be:

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/riar27su.html

Re: CCK Butcher's Knife

Wed May 08, 2013 1:47 pm

Yes to suji. Yes to Artifex. Two other good inexpensive, stainless sujis in your price range are the Fujiwara FKM and Tojiro DP.

Although a lot of knife guys consider it a good, reasonably priced, intro to Japanese carbons, I can't recommend the Fujiwara FKH. The alloy, SK5, is highly reactive crap. So reactive the knife will stink up the kitchen every time you use it until you've developed a patina. Even after you've stabilized the knife faces, it will still transfer color and odor after it's sharpened. I think you have to really, really want an inexpensive, Japanese made, carbon slicer which takes a decent edge, doesn't hold it terribly long, needs as much steeling as a Wustie, stains your food and makes it smell bad, because those are the boxes it checks.

For a carbon in the ~$100 price range -- if you can live with a knife with a full finger guard -- you might want to think about a 10" Sabatier, whether K-Sab; Mexeur et Cie; Thiers-Issard; or Thiers-Issard Nogent. Carbon Sabs are soft and require a lot of steeling, but they get very sharp, don't need sharpening very often, and are very comfortable in the hand. Buying a Nogent in particular is buying a piece of history.

If you do get serious about a Sab, let me know. There are some ins and outs, especially if you buy from The Best Things.

BDL

Re: CCK Butcher's Knife

Wed May 08, 2013 9:44 pm

@BDL " if you can live with a knife with a full finger guard -- you might want to think about a 10" Sabatier'
just out of curiosity, if one was to grind off the finger guard and make it all flush, would it make the knife 'weak' so to speak?

Re: CCK Butcher's Knife

Wed May 08, 2013 10:50 pm

Grinding all or part of the finger guard off a Sab is what's called "a good idea."

BDL
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